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Insulin pills may delay type 1 diabetes diagnosis in some individuals

Diabetes UK - 24/11/2017
Oral insulin may not prevent type 1 diabetes developing but could delay the age of diagnosis in certain individuals. The theory is that introducing insulin into the body orally may help the body’s immune system to become used to insulin. The trial involved 560 children with a very high risk of developing type 1 diabetes.

Focus given to treating diabetes in those with learning disabilities

Diabetes UK - 24/11/2017
A document has been published to ensure people with learning disabilities and diabetes are given the same level of care across the country. The NHS RightCare Pathway for Diabetes: Reasonable Adjustments for People with a Learning Disability guidance was developed because recent figures suggested diabetes and obesity rates were much higher among people with a learning disability. The NHS England Learning Disability team worked collaboratively on the document with various health agencies to compile "reasonable adjustments" so those who commission health services have a better understanding of th

Quick referral urged for patients with infection diabetic foot ulcers

Diabetes UK - 24/11/2017
Patients with an infected diabetic foot ulcer are being urged for quick referral and specialist care if required. UK researchers have issued the warning following a new report revealing that prognosis from infected diabetes foot ulcers are worse than previously thought. Around one in 10 people with diabetes develop a foot ulcer at some point, but maintaining good blood glucose control and taking good care of your feet can reduce this risk. Attending annual health checks with your doctor is pivotal so your feet can be examined for any signs of damage.

Metabolic defects and alcohol combined linked to increased risk of liver disease

Diabetes UK - 23/11/2017
A new study has found that features of the metabolic syndrome and alcohol consumption are linked with increased risk of developing liver disease. The findings suggest that people with metabolic risk factors may be more prone to alcohol-related liver damage, and that there is significant overlap of the risk factors of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcohol-related liver disease (ALD). Having NAFLD, which is known to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes, used to be considered separately from ALD.

Red eye lesions could help predict diabetic retinopathy

Diabetes UK - 23/11/2017
Pioneering eye research has shown there could be a better way of predicting diabetic retinopathy, the most common form of diabetic eye disease. Researchers say the key is looking at the location of red eye lesions which are early indicators that the sight-threatening condition might develop. The lesions are predictive of changes in the blood flow to the retina, and the study aimed to accurately map where the lesions might grow in a bid to predict whether diabetic retinopathy might eventually occur.

Twice-daily mouthwash use could increase risk of type 2 diabetes

Diabetes UK - 23/11/2017
People with a high risk of type 2 diabetes who use mouthwash twice a day are 55 per cent more likely to develop the condition within three years, a new study suggests. While an association was observed between mouthwash and type 2 diabetes, the findings do not indicate that mouthwash causes type 2 diabetes, rather the effects of mouthwash need further examination. Scientists at Harvard University were analysing links between over-the-counter mouthwash and its potential to predispose people to metabolic disorders because of the antibacterial ingredients mouthwash contains.

New test estimates odds of diabetes remission after obesity surgery

Diabetes UK - 22/11/2017
A London-based research team has developed a new three-step test that helps to better predict the success of bariatric surgery amongst people with type 2 diabetes. Although outcomes might improve with time, it was suggested that some people are more likely to achieve type 2 diabetes remission (obtaining normal blood sugars without any medication) after weight loss surgery than others. While NICE guidelines are fixated on pre-surgery body mass index (BMI) as a determinant of success of surgery, new evidence suggests that there are more important factors at play.

Gestational diabetes and high blood pressure together increase type 2 diabetes risk

Diabetes UK - 22/11/2017
Women who develop gestational diabetes and high blood pressure during their pregnancy are at greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes once they have given birth, research has suggested. The scientists from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) stressed the importance, however, of making positive lifestyle changes which can help reduce this risk.

Enterovirus vaccine protects against type 1 diabetes in mice, study reveals

Diabetes UK - 22/11/2017
An enterovirus vaccine can protect against virus-induced diabetes in mouse models of type 1 diabetes, according to new research. A prototype vaccine was shown to prevent type 1 diabetes in mice who had been infected with an enterovirus, and could mark an important development towards clinical use of vaccines in tackling type 1 diabetes in humans. Scientists at the University of Tampere, Finland, and the Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, also found that the vaccine protected against other signs of infection in mice without type 1 diabetes and had no adverse effects in vaccinated mice.

Dexcom CGM users to have clearer way of understanding trend arrows

Diabetes UK - 21/11/2017
A new method allows young people and adults with type 1 diabetes to better understand and make better use of trend arrow data from the Dexcom G5 mobile continuous glucose monitor (CGM) for adapting insulin doses. The Dexcom G5 CGM displays trend arrows indicating whether blood glucose levels are rising or falling, and how fast this is happening.

Men at greater risk of type 2 diabetes compared to women, study reports

Diabetes UK - 21/11/2017
Men are 26 per cent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than women, according to a new survey. The report, One in Ten: The Male Diabetes Crisis, was carried out by The Men's Health Forum charity. It also showed that one in 10 men in the UK now have type 2 diabetes. The findings suggested that men with diabetes are also more likely to suffer from complications linked to the condition.

Prediabetes discovery could improve detection and personalised treatment

Diabetes UK - 21/11/2017
Scientists have identified three molecules that could make earlier detection of prediabetes easier for doctors and enable more personalised treatment. This three molecule signature was shown to accurately indicate insulin resistance, or prediabetes, which is a predictor of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. Researchers from the University of Sydney's Charles Perkins Centre made the discovery following a study on mice, where they used a combination of machine learning and omics technology (which analyse genetic differences) to examine molecule types that make up the cells of an organism.

Modified blood stem cells reverse type 1 diabetes in mice

Diabetes UK - 20/11/2017
A new landmark study shows that gene-editing blood stem cells, or treating them with a triad of immune cell therapies, can reverse type 1 diabetes in mice. Edited blood stem cells may be used to re-educate the immune system's T cells, thereby curbing uncontrolled immunity in type 1 diabetes. Blood stem cells from humans and mice with diabetes have a genetic defect that reduces their capacity to produce enough of a T cell-blocking protein called PD-L1. PD-L1 is already being studied for use against many types of cancer and for the regulation of a number of autoimmune diseases.

Metformin use rising in US treatment of type 2 diabetes

Diabetes UK - 20/11/2017
The use of metformin as a first treatment for type 2 diabetes has risen by almost 30 per cent over an 11-year period, according to a study of more than one million Americans. Researchers from Australia's Queensland University of Technology say initial use of the medication increased from 60 to 77 per cent between 2005 and 2016. Sulphonylureas are still the most popular second treatment option despite prescriptions going down from 60 to 46 per cent, the study found.

Cheap unhealthy food makes healthy food choices much less likely

Diabetes UK - 20/11/2017
People are more likely to eat healthier foods such as vegetables when they are closer in price to unhealthier foods, US research reveals. Scientists from Drexel's Dornsife School of Public Health made this conclusion following an investigation on the effect that price difference has on diet quality in the US. They examined data from 2,765 people, which was linked to food prices at supermarkets in their neighbourhoods. The price of groceries was broken down into two groups: healthier and unhealthier.

Tighter blood glucose control through medication linked to higher death risk

Diabetes UK - 17/11/2017
A new study looking at the relationship between death rate and blood glucose management has found that tighter blood sugar control may raise the risk of death. Research increasingly suggests that there is an increased risk of developing health problems with both very loose and tighter blood glucose control, as a result of medication, in type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes Professional Care conferences tackles type 2 diabetes reversal and burnout

Diabetes UK - 17/11/2017
The third-ever Diabetes Professional Care conference (DPC2017) took place this week and featured discussions on several pressing issues with diabetes care. The two-day event at Olympia London included conferences and workshops on the childhood obesity strategy, type 2 diabetes and diabetes burnout. There were extremely positive discussions regarding type 2 diabetes, specifically, reversing the condition.

American boy to complete 4,200-mile walk to raise type 1 diabetes awareness

Diabetes UK - 17/11/2017
An 11-year-old boy is aiming to complete an epic walking challenge in a bid to raise awareness for type 1 diabetes. Schoolboy Noah Barnes, who has type 1 diabetes, is currently on the final leg of his 4,200-mile trek across America. He was diagnosed at 16 months old and now is hoping his mighty fundraising effort could help fund major research for a cure. He was inspired to do something to raise awareness of type 1 diabetes after watching a documentary about a man called Terry Fox who had hoped to run 3,000 miles across Canada with a prosthetic leg to raise money for charity.

UK study reignites debate over healthy obesity

Diabetes UK - 16/11/2017
A new study suggests that people who are obese with no health complications are still more likely to develop heart disease than those who are not overweight and in similar metabolic health. Previous research suggested that obese people might be protected from cardiovascular events if they didn’t have poor metabolic health, a condition sometimes referred to as "metabolically healthy obesity". Scientists have now shown that even if obese people are free of type 2 diabetes and don't have risk factors for metabolic syndrome, like high blood pressure or cholesterol imbalance, they still have a

Possible diabetes drug protects against plaque in the arteries

Diabetes UK - 16/11/2017
Researchers from the University of Aberdeen have shown that a medication, trodusquemine, is able to protect against plaque in the arteries (atherosclerosis) in a study of mice. When plaque develops in the arteries it causes narrowing of the arteries which increases the risk of major heart problems. Insulin resistance, high blood sugar and too much carbohydrate in the diet are known to increase the likelihood of plaque formation (atherosclerosis) and heart disease. Trodusquemine is a PTP1B inhibitor drug that's been developed to reduce insulin resistance and inflammation.