MRI scans

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field.) uses magnetic fields rather than radiation to produce detailed images of the body. MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. allows doctors to make a confident diagnosisThe process of determining which condition a patient may have. of intracerebral haemorrhage[Defined separately] within hours of a stroke.[2]

New MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. techniques can demonstrate the area of infarcted brain after a stroke, that is, the area of the brain that has a poor bloodA fluid that transports oxygen and other substances through the body, made up of blood cells suspended in a liquid. supply, and the part of the brain that is at risk of irreversible damage.[2,3,5]

These new MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. techniques appear to be able to detect ischaemiaInsufficient oxygenation to a part of the body due to poor blood supply. earlier and more accurately than either conventional MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. or CTA scan that generates a series of cross-sectional X-ray images. - within minutes as opposed to hours. However, even if the scan is normal, this does not necessarily mean that an acuteHas a sudden onset. ischaemic stroke can be excluded with certainty.[6]

MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. can also suggest the underlying cause of an ischaemic stroke Any sudden neurological problem caused by a bleed or a clot in a blood vessel. - for example, multiple areas damaged by poor bloodA fluid that transports oxygen and other substances through the body, made up of blood cells suspended in a liquid. supply suggest cardioembolismA blood clot originating in the heart., a clot originating from the heart. This may help in tailoring specific treatment to prevent a second occurrence.[6] MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. can also help to determine the underlying cause of a haemorrhagic stroke.[4]

However, MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. scanners are not as widely available as CTA scan that generates a series of cross-sectional X-ray images. scanners, and are also more expensive. Not everyone is able to undergo MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. scanning - for example, it is not suitable for people who have implantable pacemakers, or those who are claustrophobic. MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. scans are recommended only if they can be done within the window for stroke treatment - if this is not the case, and CTA scan that generates a series of cross-sectional X-ray images. scanning is more easily available, then a CTA scan that generates a series of cross-sectional X-ray images. scan will be done instead.[1,3]

References: 
  1. Yew KS and Cheng E. Acute stroke diagnosisThe process of determining which condition a patient may have.. Am Fam Physician. 2009; 80: 33-40.
  2. Schellinger PD, Fiebach JB, Hacke W et al. Imaging-based decision making in thrombolytic therapy for ischemic stroke: present status. Stroke 2003;34:575-83.
  3. Khaja AM and Grotta JC. Established treatments for acuteHas a sudden onset. ischaemic stroke. Lancet 2007; 369: 319-30.
  4. Sahni R and Weinberger J. Management of intracerebralWithin the brain. hemorrhage. Vasc Health Risk Manag 2007; 3: 701-9.
  5. Boon NA, Colledge NR and Walker BR. 'Davidson's Principles and Practice of Medicine'. Churchill Livingstone Elsevier. 2006; 20th edition.
  6. Engelter ST, Wetzel SG, Bonati LH et al. The clinical significance of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in stroke and TIATransient ischaemic attack; any neurological problem caused by an interruption in the blood supply to the brain that resolves within 24 hours. patients. Swiss Med Wkly 2008; 138: 729-40.