Infection

Difficulty swallowing (also known as dysphagiaPain or difficulty in swallowing.) is often experienced by people who have had a stroke. This can lead to aspiration pneumoniaInfection of the lungs owing to inhalation of a foreign body, usually food particles, through the windpipe (trachea). - a respiratory infectionInvasion by organisms that may be harmful, for example bacteria or parasites. brought about by inhaling food particles rather than swallowing them normally. A reduced level of consciousness also increases the risk of aspiration pneumoniaInfection of the lungs owing to inhalation of a foreign body, usually food particles, through the windpipe (trachea)..[1]

People with impaired swallowing may be able to take in food via a tube passed down the nose and into the stomach, rather than eating normally.[2]

Many people who have had a stroke need to have a urinary catheterA tube used either to drain fluid from the body or to introduce fluid into the body., and this increases the risk of urinary tract infectionInvasion by organisms that may be harmful, for example bacteria or parasites.. Because of this increased infectionInvasion by organisms that may be harmful, for example bacteria or parasites. risk, any urinary catheterA tube used either to drain fluid from the body or to introduce fluid into the body. should be removed as soon as possible. Rarely, infectionInvasion by organisms that may be harmful, for example bacteria or parasites. may spread to the bloodstream, although most infections can be treated with antibioticsMedication to treat infections caused by microbes (organisms that can't be seen with the naked eye), such as bacteria..[1,2]

References: 
  1. Goldstein LB. Acute ischemic stroke treatment in 2007. Circulation 2007; 116: 1504-14.
  2. Khaja AM and Grotta JC. Established treatments for acuteHas a sudden onset. ischaemic stroke. Lancet 2007; 369: 319-30.