Flu - Risk factors

Anyone can catch fluA viral infection affecting the respiratory system.. However, some people are more susceptible than others. People at greater risk of influenzaA viral infection affecting the respiratory system. infectionInvasion by organisms that may be harmful, for example bacteria or parasites. include anyone with a chronicA disease of long duration generally involving slow changes. illness, such as cardiovascular disease, kidney problems or diabetes mellitus; those who are very young and older people.[1]

Anyone whose immune systemThe organs specialised to fight infection. is suppressed is also at greater risk.[2] Unfortunately, not only are these people more susceptible to infectionInvasion by organisms that may be harmful, for example bacteria or parasites., they are also more likely to suffer a more severe illness with complications such as pneumoniaInflammation of one or both lungs..[3-6]

Flu outbreaks often occur in places where people are grouped closely together, for example, schools or hospitals.[1,7] In fact, people in hospitals are particularly at risk, as not only do they live in close association with each other, but also they are more likely to have chronicA disease of long duration generally involving slow changes. illnesses that make them more susceptible to infectionInvasion by organisms that may be harmful, for example bacteria or parasites. or its complications.[1]

Transmission between household members is also an important factor.[8] The winter outbreaks seen in temperate climates may be due in part to people being grouped together indoors because of the cold weather, making the spread of fluA viral infection affecting the respiratory system. more likely.[3] Another factor may be low vitamin D levels because of lack of sunlight.[9]

References: 
  1. Stott DJ, Kerr G and Karman WF. Nosocomial transmission of influenzaA viral infection affecting the respiratory system.. Occup Med. 2002;52:249-53.
  2. Bellei N, Carraro E, Perosa A et al. Patterns of influenzaA viral infection affecting the respiratory system. infections among different risk groups in Brazil. The Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2007;11:399-402.
  3. Taubenberger JK and Morens DM. The pathology of influenzaA viral infection affecting the respiratory system. virusA microbe that is only able to multiply within living cells. infections. Annu Rev Pathol. 2008;3:499-522.
  4. Kroneman MW and van Essen GA. Variations in influenzaA viral infection affecting the respiratory system. vaccination coverage among the high-risk population in Sweden in 2003/4 and 2004/5: a population survey. BMC Public Health. 2007;7:113-20.
  5. Quach C, Piché-Walker L, Platt R et al. Risk factors associated with severe influenzaA viral infection affecting the respiratory system. infections in childhood: implication for vaccine strategy. Pediatrics. 2003;112:e197-201.
  6. Cho BH, Kolasa MS, and Messonnier ML. Influenza vaccination coverage rate among high-risk children during the 2002-2003 influenzaA viral infection affecting the respiratory system. season. Am J Infect Control. 2008;36:582-7.
  7. Teo SSS, Nguyen-Van-Tam JS and Booy R. Influenza burden of illness, diagnosisThe process of determining which condition a patient may have., treatment, and prevention: what is the evidence in children and where are the gaps? Arch Dis Child 2005;90:532-6.
  8. Viboud C, Boëlle PY, Cauchemez S et al. Risk factors of influenzaA viral infection affecting the respiratory system. transmission in households. British Journal of General Practice. 2004;54:684-9.
  9. Yamshchikov AV, Desai NS, Blumberg HM, Ziegler TR, Tangpricha V. Vitamin D for treatment and prevention of infectious diseases: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Endocr Pract. 2009 Jul-Aug;15(5):438-49.