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Scientists create wearable diagnostic biosensor that can detect three diabetes-related compounds

News Medical (Australia) - 23/06/2017
Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas are getting more out of the sweat they've put into their work on a wearable diagnostic tool that measures three diabetes-related compounds in microscopic amounts of perspiration.

Bioengineers create more durable, versatile wearable for diabetes monitoring

Science Daily (US) - 23/06/2017
Researchers are getting more out of the sweat they've put into their work on a wearable diagnostic tool that measures three diabetes-related compounds in microscopic amounts of perspiration. In a study, the team describes their wearable diagnostic biosensor that can detect three interconnected compounds - cortisol, glucose and interleukin-6 - in perspired sweat for up to a week without loss of signal integrity.

Diabetes UK warn people living with diabetes to be cautious is hot temperatures

News Medical (Australia) - 23/06/2017
Diabetes UK warned people living with diabetes to be extra vigilant as temperatures soar across the UK.

Rising number of diabetes related amputations strain resources

ABC Australia - 23/06/2017
So many diabetics in Pacific nations are having limbs amputated that medical charities cannot keep up with the demand for wheelchairs, crutches and assisted walking devices.

Healthy Learner, Healthy Fiji aims to prevent diabetes

ABC Australia - 23/06/2017
A new program is teaching Fijian children healthy attitudes, and helping Australian university students develop their practical knowledge in health promotion.

Insulin production present in half of people living with type 1 diabetes for 10 years

Diabetes UK - 23/06/2017
Insulin production still occurs in about half of people with type 1 diabetes that have been living with the condition for 10 years or more, Swedish researchers have found. A team from the Uppsala University in Sweden studied 113 people who had been living with type 1 diabetes for more than a decade. They tested the participants using an ultra-sensitive method of identifying C-peptide in the blood. C-peptide is a protein released with insulin but not found in the insulin that people with type 1 diabetes get on prescription.

Diabetes patients still produce insulin

Science Daily (US) - 22/06/2017
Some insulin is still produced in almost half of the patients that have had type 1 diabetes for more than ten years. Patients with remaining insulin production had much higher levels in blood of interleukin-35, and they also had much more immune cells that produce interleukin-35 and dampen immune attacks, research shows.

Study finds some insulin production in almost half of diabetes patients

News Medical (Australia) - 22/06/2017
Some insulin is still produced in almost half of the patients that have had type 1 diabetes for more than ten years.

Diabetes risk can be cut by small amounts of exercise

Daily Mail (UK) - 22/06/2017
Researchers from the University of Arkansas found that even a little exercise can ward off insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes which can result from a high-fat diet.

Review assesses best treatments for osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes

Diabetes UK - 22/06/2017
The combination of osteoporosis and type 2 diabetes has been the focus of a recent study review in Greece. Osteoporosis occurs when bones become less dense and are more likely to fracture.

Beta cell survival boosting protein could slow down onset of type 1 diabetes

Diabetes UK - 22/06/2017
A new study has discovered a protein responsible for boosting the survival rate of beta cells that shows promise to slow the onset of type 1 diabetes in animals and humans. Researchers around the world have focused on increasing beta cell mass by way of various replacement therapies, such as stem cell regeneration. Here, a team of international scientists at the Medical University of Vienna have been working on early-stage therapies to keep the existing beta cell population alive.

Teenager with type 1 diabetes sent home for wearing shorts

Diabetes UK - 22/06/2017
A teenager with type 1 diabetes is speaking out after being sent home from school because he was wearing shorts during the heatwave. Callum O'Hara, who is currently taking his A-level exams at King Edward VI Sheldon Heath Academy, opted for cooler clothing because he did not want to overheat in the recent hot weather. Speaking to ITV News the 18-year-old said: "It is important I keep cool because I suffer from diabetes and my blood sugar levels rise if I get too hot.

Specific diabetes medications to protect bone health recommended

Science Daily (US) - 21/06/2017
Type 2 diabetes (T2D) and osteoporosis often coexist in patients, but managing both conditions can be a challenge. A comprehensive review highlights the most effective treatment options for treating these conditions together.

HIV has a similar impact to diabetes on heart disease risk

National Aids Manual (UK) - 21/06/2017
Living with HIV carries the same lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease as having diabetes, even after taking into account smoking, a US study has estimated. The investigators say that more research is needed to find out whether preventive treatments such as statins could reduce this risk in people who don’t

Researchers highlight need for paradigm shift in management of type 2 diabetes

News Medical (Australia) - 21/06/2017
Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide and exacerbated by type 2 diabetes, yet diabetes treatment regimens tend to focus primarily on blood sugar maintenance.

First patient treated as Australian trial tests new antibody in type 1 diabetes

Diabetes UK - 21/06/2017
A Swiss pharmaceutical company has announced the first patient has been treated in its new type 1 diabetes trial. GeNeuro, based in Geneva, is testing its phase IIa study of GNbAC1, an antibody designed to target a protein that has been linked to various autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. This envelope protein (Env) is part of the human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) family, which researchers estimate to account for up to eight per cent of the human genome. "The objective of this Phase 2a study is to demonstrate GNbAC1's safety and potential benefit in preserving pancreatic function

Poor sleep could raise HbA1c levels in teenagers with type 1 diabetes

Diabetes UK - 21/06/2017
Young people with type 1 diabetes who have poor sleeping habits could be at risk of increased HbA1c levels, a new study has suggested. The German study was developed so researchers could look at how broken sleep impacts glycemic control in teenagers with type 1 diabetes. Just over 190 young people aged around 16 years old were recruited into the trial, which used medical records to collect information on the participants.

Researchers call for paradigm shift in treating type 2 diabetes

Diabetes UK - 21/06/2017
Existing type 2 diabetes medications that lower blood sugar levels can also reduce the risk of heart disease or stroke, researchers have found. The results from four different studies have shown that using certain medications that offer both glucose control and reduce the risk of heart problems. The review, led by Dr Faramarz Ismail-Beigi, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, looked at the effects of diabetes medications including Actos (pioglitazone), Jardiance (empagliflozin), Victoza (liraglutide), or semaglutide.

Researchers find disparities in diabetes rates and foregone medical care

News Medical (Australia) - 20/06/2017
Diabetes is a serious health condition that affects millions of people in the United States and has more than doubled in prevalence over the past 20 years.

High PCSK9 levels could affect blood sugar control in type 1 diabetes

Diabetes UK - 20/06/2017
Youngsters with type 1 diabetes have higher levels of PCSK9, which correlated with higher HbA1c levels, research suggests. These levels of PCSK9 were also shown to be higher in girls than boys, with or without type 1 diabetes. PCSK9 is an enzyme that activates other proteins, which previous studies have shown to be increased in people with type 2 diabetes.