Surgery

Surgery has become another option in the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

Two types of transplant are available:

  • Transplantation of the whole pancreas
  • Transplantation of the area of the pancreas that produces insulinA hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreas that acts to lower blood glucose levels. - the pancreaticRelating to the pancreas. islets.

Although whole pancreas transplantation has been shown to be effective over time, it may be associated with a number of complications.

Islet transplantation is sometimes offered to people who have early signs of the complications of diabetes.[1]

Transplantation involves taking long-term medication to suppress the immune systemThe organs specialised to fight infection., to prevent it from attacking the new tissue A group of cells with a similar structure and a specialised function.- this medication can carry a number of risks, such as infectionInvasion by organisms that may be harmful, for example bacteria or parasites. and kidney problems. In addition, the new pancreaticRelating to the pancreas. tissue may lose function over time; if this happens, insulinA hormone produced by the beta cells of the pancreas that acts to lower blood glucose levels. therapy will be needed again.[1]

References: 
  1. Meloche RM. Transplantation for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. World J Gastroenterol. 2007; 13: 6347-55.