Imaging scans

Ultrasound

Ultrasound scanning (also called ultrasonography) produces images of the internal organs by passing very high-pitched sound waves into the body from a special microphone pressed against the skin or a probe inserted into an orifice. The sound waves bounce back off the organs and are analysed by a computer so that a picture of the internal organs can be built up on a computer screen.

Ultrasound scanning takes about 15 - 30 minutes. The pressure of the probe may feel a little uncomfortable, but should not be painful.

If you are having an abdominal ultrasound, your doctor may ask you not to eat or drink for six hours before the procedure, although you should take your usual medication. If you need to take some of your regular tablets during this time, ask your doctor whether you can take them with a little water.

CT

CTA scan that generates a series of cross-sectional X-ray images. (computerised tomographyA scan that generates a series of cross-sectional X-ray images.) scanning takes X-rayA type of electromagnetic radiation used to produce images of the body. pictures of your body in thin sections, and creates a three-dimensional image from them. These detailed images, often referred to as CAT scans, can reveal complications of Crohn's disease such as abscesses and fistulae.

To prepare for a CTA scan that generates a series of cross-sectional X-ray images. scan, you will be asked not to eat or drink for a few hours before you are scanned. For the scan you will be asked to lie on a table that will then move through the scanner.

You may have to lie still for 5 to 30 minutes, because of the number of images being taken. If you have difficulty keeping still or are in chronicA disease of long duration generally involving slow changes. pain, the technician can give you a mild sedative. You can talk to them at any time during the procedure.

MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field.) uses very strong magnets and radio waves that affect atomsThe smallest units of an element. within body cells, provoking them to send out weak radio signals of their own that can be detected and turned into images of the inside of the body. As it works using magnetism, your body is not exposed to radiation. MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. images give a better picture of soft tissues such as the stomach and intestines than X-rays can.

Although completely painless, an MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. scan can be noisy or may cause you to feel claustrophobic when you go into the scanner. As with the CTA scan that generates a series of cross-sectional X-ray images. scan, you will be able to talk to the technician all the time. You might find it helpful to watch this video on how to prepare for an MRIAn abbreviation for magnetic resonance imaging, a technique for imaging the body that uses electromagnetic waves and a strong magnetic field. scan, and how it is performed.